4 pics 1 word answers logo quiz answers guess the emoji answers 100 pics quiz answers closeup pics answers Website Security Horoskopi Horoskopi sot Horoskopi ditor Poezi dashurie poezi dashuria Dragon City Dragon City Hack Godaddy Coupon Codes Godaddy Coupon Code free coupons hostgator coupon mpix coupon code promo codes voucher codes overstock coupon online coupons discount vouchers voucher codes printable coupons pizza hut coupons top ten top ten movies top 10
Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education

Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn

What does it take to be successful?

Ponder this question while trolling quote sites and you get a pretty good picture of what others think — preparedness, hard work, vision, stick-with-it-ness, determination, and the ability to turn challenges into opportunities. (It is curious to note that not one quote suggested needing to know a specific set of knowledge about the 13 original colonies, but I digress.)

All of these boil down to attitude — how one approaches life, living, and learning.

In the abstract that makes sense, but in real life?

My wife spent her undergraduate years learning Russian.  When asked what inspired a degree in Russian, she states simply, “I loved the books in English and wanted to read them as they were originally written.”

After earning her degree she decided to go to law school to pursue her dream of becoming an environmental lawyer. A year later she found herself in the revered halls of an ivy league institution learning a wholly different set of content.

My point?

The content of her undergraduate years have proven to be immensely useless.  She might well have learned macrame.  However, what has proven indispensably useful has been her approach to learning — a voracious curiosity accompanied by an unmistakeably outstanding work ethic.

In essence, what she learned was not as important as how she approached learning it.

I believe the same is true for pre-service teachers (students in the colleges of education preparing for a career in education). How they approach their practicums, internships, and experiences with students determines the value they draw from it.  In my opinion, it is their attitude that provides the best barometer for determining their eventual success as educators.

Don’t get me wrong, methods courses provide necessary and significant exposure to tools for effectively accomplishing curricular goals and objectives.  I draw on lessons I learned from those classes daily.  However, those classes represent the frame of the house, not the foundation.

What does it take to be successful as a teacher, regardless of the age of the student or the content being taught?  And what patterns of behavior do we want to see established in our new and emerging corps of graduates?

While interns who know their jargon and can execute a lesson like a recipe generally do well, those are not faultless indicators of future success in classrooms.  I’m more interested in student teachers that come in, get involved, ask questions, engage with the students, make mistakes, learn from them and ask the question, “Is there anything else I can do?”  Unfortunately, these seem to be few and far between.

Whenever new interns or pre-service teachers show up in my classroom I ask what their requirements are and what my responsibilities for oversight are expected to be.  I often find an inordinate number of tasks  (teach a lesson, create a unit, modify for an ESL student, etc).  Necessary tasks, to be sure, but they often lack behavioral expectations that cultivate a long-term, self-motivated professional development mindset.

I developed the below list that I give to practicum and interning students.  I tell them we will use the list as a jump start for conversations about the teaching profession, their development, and as a reflection tool for digesting their experiences in my classroom.  I also tell them I will provide end of the experience evaluation based on those skill sets and behavior patterns.  I make sure to iterate that I do not expect mastery or perfection, just effort and growth.

Most of the time they swallow, steel their will, and then agree to use these areas as starting points for our conversations about their experiences in my classroom.  Some stammer out the ole’ “But, but, but . . . ” or the classic, “But this isn’t what my professor is grading me on.” Their reaction is an instant assessment of who might do well in this field and who still has a long way to go.

In the end, I’ve found that interns and practicum students using this set of criteria give far more to the experience than the ones left to satisfy only their professors’ expectations.  Perhaps it has only enabled me to more consistently address core components of teaching.  Whatever the case, an additional benefit is that I find I reflect on and learn about my own practice to a greater degree when using this tool with the pre-service teachers.

After reading, please share your thoughts and ideas.  What would you add to the list?  What would you take away?  What type of assessment device do you use to offer both summative and formative data to preservice teachers?

Intern “Grading”/Feedback Areas

Four basic areas:

1.    Students
2.    Approach
3.    Content
4.    Environment

Students

•    Building positive, professional rapport with them
•    Attending to their ‘needs’ while helping them to understand and work toward their ‘wants’
•    Engaging with and listening to them
•    Exposing them to new ideas and ways of approaching problems
•    Providing them with opportunities to practice and succeed
•    Building skills at managing whole class and understanding roots of behaviors

Approach

•    Inquisitiveness (about methods, incidents, possibilities)
•    Taking the initiative to be involved with students, grading, research, or other area you see or identify as in need of development or attention
•    Professionalism – timely, dedicated, and quality-driven
•    Enthusiastic and energetic (at least not asleep)
•    Willingness (eagerness) to take-on/try new responsibilities
•    Actively acquiring and incorporating educational knowledge base to improve and inform practice

Content

•    Thoughtfulness of lessons
•    Thoroughness of research
•    Accuracy of information
•    Balancing didactic instruction with engagement
•    Staying flexible to student interest without loosing conceptual objective
•    Working to integrate themes, concepts, skills, and ideas between disciplines

Environment

•    Ensuring emotional and physical safety
•    Cultivating a culture of curiosity and inquisitiveness
•    Managing resources
•    Maintaining high expectations for quality
•    Cultivating a sense of consistency, fairness, and democracy
•    Setting high standard for compassion, tolerance, and understanding in regards to differences and   diversity

Tags: , , , , ,

Author:Jason Flom

Learner. Educator. Reader. Writer. Cyclist. Part-time Polyanna. Husband. Daddy. Founder, Ecology of Education. Director of Learning Platforms, Q.E.D. Foundation. Twitter: @JasonFlom. LinkedIn: Jason Flom; Edutopia's Green School Group; and doing dishes while pretending to be a professional underground rapper. "I regard it as the foremost task of education to insure the survival of these qualities: an enterprising curiosity, an undefeatable spirit, tenacity in pursuit, readiness for sensible self denial, and above all, compassion." Kurt Hahn
  • Jessica Luallen Horton

    Loving this blog, although insulted that you imply macrame is useless….

    I too was very concerned about the direction my interns/pre-interns were heading. I think there is a major disconnect between university expectations and district “real world” expectations. We even had interns that never intended to pursue teaching…explain how they ever got into our classrooms??? I got the impression that sometimes the university feedback on actual classroom experiences was that nagging “other” task required of professors, when they weren’t teaching or publishing.

    I actually developed my own evaluation sheet as well, because I didn’t think that the students were required to reflect enough on their lessons. I’ll dig around for it. I love your list, and would only suggest adding being able to see the bigger picture (i.e. where are we going with these individual lessons, how does this serve the overall subject matter). I say this because a lot of interns would have cutesy lessons with no real content that was important to master towards assessment or promotion. You can teach 10 standards in one lesson if planned creatively and appropriately.

    These :
    –Willingness (eagerness) to take-on/try new responsibilities
    –Actively acquiring and incorporating educational knowledge base to improve and inform practice
    –Taking the initiative to be involved with students, grading, research, or other area you see or identify as in need of development or attention”

    are KEY!!!

    I think the best teachers are those with the most initiative….
    Glad to have someone like you busting the chops of our pre-service teachers… they don’t know how lucky they are.

  • Jessica Luallen Horton

    Loving this blog, although insulted that you imply macrame is useless….

    I too was very concerned about the direction my interns/pre-interns were heading. I think there is a major disconnect between university expectations and district “real world” expectations. We even had interns that never intended to pursue teaching…explain how they ever got into our classrooms??? I got the impression that sometimes the university feedback on actual classroom experiences was that nagging “other” task required of professors, when they weren’t teaching or publishing.

    I actually developed my own evaluation sheet as well, because I didn’t think that the students were required to reflect enough on their lessons. I’ll dig around for it. I love your list, and would only suggest adding being able to see the bigger picture (i.e. where are we going with these individual lessons, how does this serve the overall subject matter). I say this because a lot of interns would have cutesy lessons with no real content that was important to master towards assessment or promotion. You can teach 10 standards in one lesson if planned creatively and appropriately.

    These :
    –Willingness (eagerness) to take-on/try new responsibilities
    –Actively acquiring and incorporating educational knowledge base to improve and inform practice
    –Taking the initiative to be involved with students, grading, research, or other area you see or identify as in need of development or attention”

    are KEY!!!

    I think the best teachers are those with the most initiative….
    Glad to have someone like you busting the chops of our pre-service teachers… they don’t know how lucky they are.

  • http://www.ecologyofeducation.net Jason Flom

    Big picture vision — very important. Especially when it comes to developing long-range plans that ensure the objectives of individual lessons, “cutesy” or not, have relevant value.

    Thanks. I’ll add to my hand-out.

  • http://www.ecologyofeducation.net Jason Flom

    Big picture vision — very important. Especially when it comes to developing long-range plans that ensure the objectives of individual lessons, “cutesy” or not, have relevant value.

    Thanks. I’ll add to my hand-out.

  • http://twitter.com/kahilled/status/1494331743 Kahille

    RT@JasonFlom Perfect resource for me w/undergrad educ. interns I mentor-Teaching teachers to teach, er, I mean, Learn. http://bit.ly/QV6w

  • http://twitter.com/kdwashburn/statuses/tag:search.twitter.com,2005:1551052634 kdwashburn

    Thoughts worthy of consideration: Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn http://bit.ly/QV6w #eudcation #teaching #learning

  • Pingback: Twitted by JasonFlom

  • http://twitter.com/jasonflom/status/2354938883 Jason Flom

    @iMrsF This is the form I use for engaging interns now: http://bit.ly/QV6w (at bottom of blog post)

  • Pingback: Twitted by 1ernesto1

  • http://twitter.com/1ernesto1/status/ Ernesto Gonzalez

    interesante: “Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education” ( http://bit.ly/lqETE )

  • http://twitter.com/1ernesto1/status/2631677761 Ernesto Gonzalez

    interesante: "Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education" ( http://bit.ly/lqETE )

  • http://twitter.com/pgsimoes/status/2631775659 Paulo Simões

    RT: @NFraga: RT @1ernesto1: “Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education” ( http://bit.ly/lqETE )

  • http://twitter.com/tomwhitby/status/2632201046 Tom Whitby

    Great 4 preservice tchrs&Profs RT @1ernesto1: “Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education” ( http://bit.ly/lqETE )

  • http://twitter.com/jasonflom/status/2634435758 Jason Flom

    RT @1ernesto1: "Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education" ( http://bit.ly/lqETE )

  • http://twitter.com/prestwickhouse/status/2656277076 Prestwick House

    RT @1ernesto1: “Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education” ( http://bit.ly/lqETE )

  • http://twitter.com/edubeat/status/5725128333 EDUBEAT

    Teaching Teachers to Teach, er, I mean, Learn | Ecology of Education" ( http://bit.ly/lqETE ) …

  • http://twitter.com/jasonflom/status/8032549191 Jason Flom

    @SimpleK12 @NewsNeus @passandr "Teaching Teachers to Teach, Er, I Mean Learn" http://bit.ly/QV6w (Scroll down for intern checklist) #edchat

  • http://twitter.com/jasonflom/status/170312026852311040 Jason Flom

    @erringreg Here are the criteria areas I use with my student teachers: http://t.co/tZNv6yFb (scroll down for it) #ntchat (@wmchamberlain)